Nearest Neighbor Classification

There are times when the relationships among examples you want to classify are messy and complicated. This makes it difficult to actually classify them. Yet in this same situation, items of the same class have a lot of features in common even though the overall sample is messy. In such a situation, nearest neighbor classification may be useful.

Nearest neighbor classification uses a simple technique to classify unlabeled examples. The algorithm assigns an unlabeled example the label of the nearest example. This based on the assumption that if two examples are next to each other they must be of the same class.

In this post, we will look at the characteristics of nearest neighbor classification as well as the strengths and weakness of this approach.

Characteristics

Nearest neighbor classification uses the features of the data set to create a multidimensional feature space. The number of features determines the number of dimensions. Therefore, two features leads to a two-dimensional feature space, three features leads to a three dimensional feature space, etc. In this feature space all the examples are placed based on their respective features.

The label of the unknown examples are determined by who the closet neighbor is or are. This calculation is based on Euclidean distance, which is the shortest distance possible. The number of neighbors that are used to calculate the distance varies at the discretion of the researcher. For example, we could use one neighbor or several to determine the label of an unlabeled example. There are pros and cons to how many neighbors to use. The more neighbors used the more complicated the classification becomes.

Nearest neighbor classification is considered a type of lazy learning. What is meant by lazy is that no abstraction of the data happens. This means there is no real explanation or theory provide by the model to understand why there are certain relationships. Nearest neighbor tells you where the relationships are but not why or how. This is partly due to the fact that it is a non-parametric learning method and provides no parameters (summary statistics) about the data.

Pros and Cons

Nearest neighbor classification has the advantage of being simple, highly effective, and fast during the training phase. There are also no assumptions made about the data distribution. This means that common problems like a lack of normality are not an issue.

Some problems include the lack of a model. This deprives us of insights into the relationships in the data. Another concern is the headache of missing data.  This forces you to spend time cleaning the data more thoroughly.  One final issue is that the classification phase of a project is slow and cumbersome because of the messy nature of the data.

Conclusion

Nearest neighbor classification is one useful tool in machine learning. This approach is valuable for times when the data is heterogeneous but with clear homogeneous groups in the data. In a future post, we will go through an example of this classification approach using R.

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2 thoughts on “Nearest Neighbor Classification

  1. Pingback: Nearest Neighbor Classification | Education and...

  2. Pingback: Basics of Support Vector Machines | educational research techniques

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