Steps for Approaching Data Science Analysis

Research is difficult for many reasons. One major challenge of research is knowing exactly what to do. You have to develop your way of approaching your problem, data collection and analysis that is acceptable to peers.

This level of freedom leads to people literally freezing and not completing a project. Now imagine have several gigabytes or terabytes of data and being expected to “analyze” it.

This is a daily problem in data science. In this post, we will look at one simply six step process to approaching data science. The process involves the following six steps

  1. Acquire data
  2. Explore the data
  3. Process the data
  4. Analyze the data
  5. Communicate the results
  6. Apply the results

Step 1 Acquire the Data

This may seem obvious but it needs to be said. The first step is to access data for further analysis. Not always, but often data scientist are given data that was already collected by others who want answers from it.

In contrast with traditional empirical research in which you are often involved from the beginning to the end, in data science you jump to analyze a mess of data that others collected. This is challenging as it may not be clear what people what to know are what exactly the collected.

Step 2 Explore the Data

Exploring the data allows you to see what is going on. You have to determine what kinds of potential feature variables you have, the level of data that was collected (nominal, ordinal, interval, ratio). In addition, exploration allows you to determine what you need to do to prep the data for analysis.

Since data can come in many different formats from structured to unstructured. It is critical to take a look at the data through using summary statistics and various visualization options such as plots and graphs.

Another purpose for exploring data is that it can provide insights into how to analyze the data. If you are not given specific instructions as to what stakeholders want to know, exploration can help you to determine what may be valuable for them to know.

Step 3 Process the Data

Processing data involves cleaning it. This involves dealing with missing data, transforming features, addressing outliers, and other necessary processes for preparing analysis. The primary goal is to organize the data for analysis

This is a critical step as various machine learning models have different assumptions that must be met. Some models can handle missing data some cannot. Some models are affected by outliers some are not.

Step 4 Analyze the Data

This is often the most enjoyable part of the process. At this step, you actually get to develop your model. How this is done depends on the type of model you selected.

In machine learning, analysis is almost never complete until some form of validation of the model takes place. This involves taking the model developed on one set of data and seeing how well the model predicts the results on another set of data. One of the greatest fears of statistical modeling is overfitting, which is a model that only works on one set of data and lacks the ability to generalize.

Step 5 Communicate Results

This step is self-explanatory. The results of your analysis needs to be shared with those involved. This is actually an art in data science called storytelling. It involves the use of visuals as well-spoken explanations.

Steps 6 Apply the Results

This is the chance to actual use the results of a study. Again, how this is done depends on the type of model developed. If a model was developed to predict which people to approve for home loans, then the model will be used to analyze applications by people interested in applying for a home loan.

Conclusion

The steps in this process is just one way to approach data science analysis. One thing to keep in mind is that these steps are iterative, which means that it is common to go back and forth and to skip steps as necessary. This process is just a guideline for those who need direction in doing an analysis.

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